The Bible — The Greatest Dust Magnet of All?

Part 1 from a blog on The Seed Company

There are people who have read fewer verses of the Bible than I own versions of the Bible.

In fact, the number of people who are still waiting for one verse of the Bible to be translated into their language exceeds the population of the United States of America. This is Bible poverty.

And yet we take the Bible for granted.

According to the Center for Bible Engagement, 66% of American Christians rarely — or never — read their Bibles.

No other book has sold more copies or collected more dust than the Bible. When we don’t engage with God’s Word, we, too, experience Bible poverty.

Why We Need the Bible

In 1998, James Kennedy and Jerry Newcombe wrote a book called, What If the Bible Had Never Been Written? The table of contents lists chapters addressing morality, society, law, politics, science, literature and exploration. Truly, our world today would not be the same without the powerful impact of the Bible.

The Bible offers:

  • A worldview that explains where we come from, what’s gone wrong, and what can be done about it.
  • Revelation of who God is and how we can have a friendship with Him.
  • Wisdom for making decisions and growing spiritually.
  • Guidance that applies to everyday life including marriage, work, money and tragedy.
  • Insight regarding the afterlife.

It’s no wonder Jesus emphasized Deuteronomy 8:3, “Man does not live on bread alone but on every word that comes from the mouth of the LORD.”

We need what the Bible has to offer.

Tyler Ellis serves on staff with Newark Church of Christ as a Campus Minister at the University of Delaware. He’s also an advocate in the cause of ending Bible poverty. Through his upcoming book Question Everything, he will donate 10 percent of the royalties to OneVerse, a program of The Seed Company. Hear more from Tyler on his blog, Facebook and Twitter.

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